Nude is addictive

I hate to break this news to you, but it is. At least for me.

nude, having coffee

Over the last few weeks we had a lot of warm and hot days. 25C to 28C, add about 55 for Fahrenheit, and you’ll be close enough.

That kind of weather warms up my apartment rapidly, and it makes me lose my clothes at the same rate. Working from home, only meeting people via video-conferencing, makes that easy. Just have a shirt handy for those video-calls.

Until there is the need to go on-site to a customer. Then the big world insists on clothes again. And then I find how addictive being nude is. Clothes feel like an insult after a few days of none of them. That only gets worse when that number of days goes up.

After such an on-site visit, I don’t know how fast I should get out of that cloth prison again. It’s amazing how extra hot my body feels when the heat from the outside world comes in and has no way to escape.

Nude in Space

Why can’t we all be ‘au naturel’ when the weather’s right for it? When I see how climate is changing (climate change deniers, please stop reading here), the world that I’ve depicted in “Nude in Space” seems to get ever closer. The idea of villages where everyone lives nude is great, but the other side of the medal (and you know that if you read the book) is that life is being made impossible on Earth. And the tragedy is that ‘life’ is doing that to itself.

Let’s hope things don’t get that far (the impossible part). Just the naturist / nude people villages. I can’t wait for those to pop up. The more the better!

Meanwhile I’ll avoid clothes as much as I did over the last weeks, as long as the weather is beneficial to that!

Kids Kamp 2022 – Naturally science

There is a great initiative going to get kids to camp. And not just any camp, but a nudist camp.

Kids Kamp 2022, Cedar Trails Nudist Retreat
New Nudist Podcast logo

I heard about this initiative while listening to the New Nudist Podcast.

(You can listen to that episode here.)

First off, and don’t hold this against me, I have nothing with “children”. I never wanted them of my own and I have succeeded in that very well. That being said, I know the value of children, and what they can mean for ‘us’, being humanity.

The podcast is one long interview with Rick Sloan, the person who started Kids Kamp over a decade ago. Don’t be alarmed, it’s a very interesting and informative interview. The things that are talked about all touched me.

  • Nudism / naturism.
  • The health aspect of our lifestyle.
  • The mentioning of a therapist who suggested a family to visit a nudist resort!
  • The opportunity for children to learn and experience something first hand.

Hello, what’s not to like in this line-up? (Yes, of course, there are always things that someone won’t like, but really…)

At the moment of writing, the donations reach $6,785 dollars:

If you listen to the podcast, you will hear that this kind of camp does cost a lot of money. Something that I think is awesome: naturists can sponsor children to have this week of camp. Children from parents who can’t afford this. Doing something like this is paying it forward. It’s putting kids in a safe and healthy environment, smack in the middle of naturists, and they learn some great things too!

What’s not to like? AANR Mid-West is helping out. AANR is helping out. Children who were sponsored to enjoy this week are helping out by volunteering. If you have 1, 5 or 10 dollars to spare, help Rick and Susan with this cause, please.

If you want to make a donation, or visit the GoFundme-page yourself to check it out, you can go here.

Yes. I donated.

Thank you.

Paul

In naturism size doesn’t matter

This might sound weird but I think it’s true.

A man can be big and strong and impressive, but in the nude that doesn’t matter. The only thing that seems to matter (for those who don’t understand naturism) are the bits of a person that can be seen that are usually hidden.

Indeed, these bits are genitals and female breasts. Naturists know that people come in all shapes and sizes. Being naked, there’s hardly a way around that unless you’re visually handicapped, and even then a person is probably aware of that. (If you have other experiences, please share, I’m genuinely curious.)

These are the ‘problem parts’ for the non-understanding ones. For the people who lived in the repressed environment of clothialism, so to speak.

For me this is another indication that the whole clothing-obsessed world is wrong. The clothialists get further and further away from nature and all things natural, including their own bodies. I have heard stories about people who are so ‘body conscious’ that they don’t even dare to be nude in their own home, when they’re alone and no one can see them.

Isn’t that sad?

People who shower in their underwear. How awful to even consider that.

And for exactly those same repressed people, the size of a penis, a behind or some breasts matters. As if that defines a person. Certifiably bonkers, I tell you. That is now how naturists define people. Because, in naturism, size doesn’t matter. I know big people and tiny people, and they’re beautiful people. I know “beautiful” people who are downright ugly on the inside.

Size doesn’t matter.

People are people.

Do you agree?

Pajamas. Why?

Why??

I ve been trying to find out why people wear night-clothes. Pajamas. Nightgowns. Nightshirts.

Seriously. Why?

I did some research and found that the “pajama” was copied from the clothing of Indian Maharajas and Rajas. They didn’t wear them to bed. Instead their pajamas were “recorded as the “uniform” of both the Indian gentry and peasants, also transcended sex, being worn by both men and women.” (According to an article on Dolce & Gabana.)

Pajamas were brought over to Europe by the English, who seemed to think it looked neat. The word pajama comes from the Hindi “pae jama” or “pai jama,” meaning leg clothing, and its usage dates back to the Ottoman Empire. (Source.)

Before the pajama, there were ‘nightshirts’ or nightgowns. According to Wikipedia, these were in fashion since around 1530. Before that time, it was apparently commonplace to sleep naked.

Now, with the lack of heating and a handful of cold winters I can imagine that people do their best to stay warm, but then fashion hits (even back then) and these things get turned into wannahaves and even fashion statements.

In our time, with most people not suffering from cold in winter (unless they want to), there is no reason for those floppy bits of fabric around your body. As we all know, sleeping in the nude is much healthier.

Woman sleeping naked
Sleeping naked

Whoever started using pajamas (which were day clothes!) in bed is still a puzzle to me, and I think to anyone who’s investigating that. It probably had its use back then, but today… it’s so unnecessary.

Stay naked, everyone. Also in bed.

My belief is nudity

With the Easter weekend behind us, I suddenly wonder why so many people still have problems believing that the nude life can be a good life. Yes, ‘naturally’ there will always people who think they’re right and we’re wrong, but isn’t it odd how strong and lopsided ‘belief’ can be?

Christians are told to believe that 2000 and some years ago, a man got up in his grave and came back to the world. Sure, if that’s what you want to believe, go right ahead.

For some reason it takes an even larger leap of faith / believing that people like to be naked. That is a step or bridge or belief too far for most people in this world. It strikes me time and again that this ancient resurrection story is accepted as gospel (pun intended), and that we, the living proof of the joy of the nude life, have this constant battle against disbelief.

A few days ago I was at our local nude beach, and while I was there – with about 6 or 7 other nude people, I was “hit” by the calm and serenity of the place.

View from the local nude beach

If I desperately had to pick a church, this would be it. No hassle, no “have to”, just a bunch of kind people that are there to relax. They don’t need a belief or faith to know this is a good thing.

The good life. Nude.

Even better: no one has any interest in what you believe or think. As long as you behave according to the rules of the nude beach and you don’t make a mess, you’re golden.

I have yet to find a group of people that’s so diverse, yet so tight-knit in their conviction that the nude way is the good way.

Of course, there is the odd incident that someone creates a problem, but that’s not hard to deal with. The majority is peaceful and accepting of everyone from the start, and only when you’ve shown you can’t behave, you will be asked to leave. I’ve seen it happen only twice, so far.

Give me the belief that nude is good. Others can take their own beliefs and be happy with them.

Memento Mori

You’ve probably heard or read that one before. Memento Mori. I was surprised to find something unexpected when I looked for an image for this.

Memento Mori
Remember, you can die.

Almost always this is depicted with a skull. Perhaps a common thing in the US, but not in the Netherlands, where I reside. Ah well, learnt something new today.

A few days ago I heard a podcast about Memento Mori. A good one, explaining that this is not a warning but a reminder. A reminder that we will all die someday, and therefore we shouldn’t postpone things until later – because later may never come.

The podcast speaker (presenter?) also said that Memento Mori is the opposibe of the oh-so-beloved bucket list, the list with things people want to do later.

Why wait? Why not do it now, because now you’re alive and able to do it – and remember doing it. And perhaps up to doing it again.

If there’s a nude beach you want to visit and you have the option now, do it. If there’s a nude resort you plan on visiting, do it now. (I can recommend the Mighty Oaks, the staff there is great! 😉 )

Body paint magic

Listening to this podcast I realised that there are 2 lives. 1 that keeps you alive (as in gets the food, the rent paid, and stuff like that) and 1 that you need to fulfill as much as you can when you can. The life that you want to live now. The body painting, the nude events, the naked bike rides, the nude swims.

Putting them off to a time that may never come is a sad thing. And trust me (or not, up to you), once you’ve done all those things, you won’t end up with nothing left to do, because each event, each happening will open a new door, new options to do and try too.

I think this is part of the magic we can create for ourselves and each other. Create options and events, and invite others. Together the magic is even bigger. And don’t put them on the bucket list. Put them on the list of things done, the list you can look at with pride.

Change what you can

We all want the entire world to become naturist. Or at least, that the entire world accepts naturists as sane and full members of society. We don’t want to be seen as weirdos, or – even worse – perverts and child molesters.

By now we all know that it’s easy to reach the entire world, because we have this crazy little thing called Internet. At the same time, we should realise that it’s not possible to change the entire world. Some folks will want to listen. Others are stuck in their ways and ruts so deeply that no mammoth tanker or Kenworth truck can pull them out of it.

Change... loading...

It’s important to know where our boundaries are. Not in the way of self-limiting where we want to and can be nude in nature, but in the way of recognising who we can (try to) change (as in perspective about nudity) and who’s beyond help / hope.

Some people will keep running into the same wall forever, hoping to bring it down. Kudos for determination, but minus several hundred points for smart, because it is a waste of energy and time. Energy and time that can better be used to be nude with others, to enjoy the time we have. It’s also possible that such determination will have an adverse effect on that wall (those people who don’t want to see our ways). The people who keep trying will be seen as annoying, pests and other bad things, which is not helping the reputation of naturists anywhere. “The wall” has access to this crazy little Internet as well, and they can spread anti-propaganda towards naturism.

P.Z. Walker
P.Z. Walker

So let’s be smart about this whole ‘conversion’ thing. Don’t go out of your way trying to change everything and everyone.

Go where it’s convenient, where you have a proper chance for change. Let that do its work, because the more people are in a specific mindset, the more overall consciousness will shift. That shift will be slow, and we may not see the definitive change, but it will happen if we do this the smart way.

Jerome Naturel

Last week I listened to the newest Naturist Living show podcast.

It’s an interview with a Belgian man who got to be known as Jerome Naturel.

I enjoyed this episode so much that I’m pointing it out here, and I hope you will take the time to have a listen. Jerome goes quite in-depth about his path to being where he is now, and I think it holds lots of interesting ideas and steps for many of us to copy.

So please, listen and perhaps pick up some good things from it!

Indoor naturism and social demons

It’s what I do, mainly. I’m an indoor person, definitely with the winter weather here in the Netherlands.

I feel very privileged to have this possibility of not having to wear clothes when I’m at home. I live high up, people can’t see me from the street – even when I’m on the balcony.

Many people are into social naturism. I sometimes try to do that too, but life has taught me that I’m not a many-people person. Do you count yourself a social one, who can’t get enough people around? (Which in the past weeks and months and… has been quite difficult!)

I don’t know why I am this way.

My parents were very social and outgoing. My sister is like that as well. I am not and I never was. The odd thing is that, when I do go to some social event, it usually feels like something that was worth the effort. (Because really, getting up and going there is an emotional effort, even if it’s just a 20 minute bike ride to get to the local nude beach.)

It’s weird. I know the people there are nice and friendly, and most of the time, if you keep to yourself, they will leave you in peace, but that odd feeling remains. On the off chance that you, reading this, are like me, how do you handle things like that? Do you stay at home and indoors as much as well, or do you go out and face the ‘social demon’? (That concept just popped into my head, ha ha!)

And oh wow, as I was looking for a picture to go with social demons, I stumbled over this. It’s actually a thing. Not sure if this is something I am going to take on yet, but if you’re interested, you can find the book here.

Until I figure this out (and that might take a while) I’ll stick to the anti social social club and be who I am.

(It gives me a lot of time to focus on the stories!)