Aussie Nudist Olympics take a move

Queensland has lost a $2 million-a-year tourism event to New South Wales where nude bathing is legal and their police do not arrest nudists for wilful exposure.

The annual Nude Olympics, which pulls more than 600 people a year to Noosa’s Alexandria Bay after the first event 40 years ago, has been cancelled.

Nudists in Europe try a spot of beach archery. Photo: Michel Gangne

The event, organised by the Australian Naturists Federation, will be held this March at Byron Bay, either at its legal Tyagarah nude beach or the north Belongil Beach.

Both beaches are on the northern coastline of Byron Bay.

Queensland has lost the $2 million a year Nude Olympics in part because of a crackdown on nude bathers.

Queensland is the only state that does not allow its councils to vote and choose “clothing-optional” beaches.

Negotiations have begun with Byron Shire Council to hold the 2017 Nude Olympics at Belongil Beach.

Source: Brisbane Times where you can read more about this.

When naturism costs jobs

I’m sure you all read or heard about it. A British school teacher, Christine Wright, was told to take early retirement after the school she worked at found out she was a naturist.

She said: “It’s not something I ever spoke about at work but some busy body outed me.

“They rang up my employer and told them I was a naturist. To hurt me. It ended up with me taking early retirement. I’m not going deny who I am.”

I was bloody well shocked after hearing about this. How sad is this, to force someone out of the job they love, because of a brain-twisted idiot who doesn’t know the difference between a life style and paedophiles?

I truly believe that teachers are most at risk of losing their jobs, because they work with children, and – as we all know – the children’s tender souls need to be protected from the big bad world where people walk around with no clothes. Murder and other kinds of violence are okay, greed is applauded, but OMG, as the expression goes, no nudity please!

She says she believes that naturism is misunderstood, comparing them to other minorities.

She added: “Sometimes I think we’re in the same position the gay community were in 20 years ago.

I hope we all will live to see the day that naturism isn’t considered the bad thing that many uneducated people think it is.

(Quotes and image courtesy of The Irish Sun.)

Who are you converting?

Converting to nudism.

Yes. You. Are you converting people to naturism and/or nudism?

And if so, do you have any success with that? Please share.

I never try to convert people to nudism and I have several reasons for that.

Reason 1: Respect.

If you’re pushing your opinion onto other people, you show a total lack of respect. Note that this is not the same as telling people what you think and feel.

Do you like having people going on and on, taking up your time, talking about things you know you don’t want to hear? Probably not. It’s that with our way of life.

Sometimes people aren’t ready for it and they don’t want to hear about it constantly, no matter how good your intentions are. Respect other people’s opinion and way of life.

Reason 2: Being ready.

People can be not ready to engage in naturism. You need to understand that they, like everyone of us, grew up in their own environment with their own beliefs and convictions.

Many of them ‘know’ that being naked is not good, abnormal, sinful, not like their God told them to live and whatever other reason you can think of. There are plenty of them.

Trying to convert such people will only make them angry. You’re actually pushing them away from the nude lifestyle. It’s one thing to tell them how you live, another to push them into it. If someone is interested in some way or another, you can talk about it. If they’re still interested you can invite them. Don’t tell anyone he or she has to try it, though. The world and in many cases religion already puts enough ‘have to’s’ on people, having another one is not what most people need.

Reason 3: be the change.

Mahatma Gandhi

This is the only proper way to demonstrate how you feel, how you are and how you wish to continue. Tell people who you are and what you are. See if they are curious. If not: at least you have told your story. If yes: they will ask more.

Be the one you say you are. If you say you love to be naked and you have the option to be naked at home: do it. Tell the people they ‘risk‘ seeing you undressed when they come to visit. There’s always the option for them to warn you that they’re coming and please put something on. At that point it’s up to you do do that or decline that. Here comes the respect part again as well. It’s partly from your side but certainly also from their side. If they can’t respect you to be the way you want in your home then they should invite you over to their home.

End words.

Maybe you agree with all this. Maybe you have entirely other ideas. I respect that. These views are mine.

Whatever you feel, thank you for reading this far. If you have something to say about it, there’s always the comment box. Share your ideas. Tell me about them.

Teach me, expand my knowledge, but don’t try to convert me.

Nude exercising is the thing.

I’ve said it before, and many others already know that it’s the best. Nude exercising.

Now Basingstoke personal trainer, Helen Smith, has caught on as well:

AN EXERCISE class for people in the nude launched its first class on Saturday.

The Nude-ercise session, run by a personal trainer from Basingstoke, takes place every third Saturday of the month at Nursling Village Hall in Southampton.

The first class saw 10 people follow instructions from trainer Helen Smith, who is also a member of naturist group British Naturism and runs the hour-long class for a price of £8 from 5pm.

Helen, 35, said: “I think people are starting to embrace naturism more and more.

“The idea behind it is that it’s your natural body and there’s nothing sexual about it.

“The main benefit of exercising naked is that you can really see what the instructor is doing in the exercises.

“You also don’t have to think about washing sweaty gym clothes after the class.

“People are required to pre-register by emailing me and to show ID at the beginning, just for everyone’s peace of mind.”

The class featured participants between the ages of 33 and 70 with the activity being described as a gentle boot camp.

It included jumping jacks, sit ups and partner work. Helen left her job as a recruitment consultant two years ago to become a full-time fitness instructor and was inspired to become a naturist after visiting a nude beach in southern France.

Helen said: “I was on holiday with my partner and we turned up at a naturist beach and thought ‘let’s do it’ and it was a really enjoyable afternoon.

“People are starting to embrace naturism more and more. “In this day and age you have pop stars wearing scantily-clad clothing and on the other hand you have things like naked bike rides.”

Other classes will take place in London as well as other towns including Reading, Guildford and Alton.

(Source: Basingstoke Gazette.)

A nudist wiki.

Hey you all.

You have missed a post last week. That’s because I didn’t post a post here last week. It was kind of rough as on Tuesday I was told my contract wasn’t renewed. So much for that job.

Now to the topic at hand. Wiki. You all have heard of it, right? Wikipedia? On a hunch I jumped onto the Internet (don’t worry, not much got damaged and I hid the evidence) and I discovered there is no proper nudism wiki! Did I miss it in my search?

If you know of one, do let me know.

Wikis are great ways to convey information in a clear and easy to understand way, like this Wikihow page on becoming a nudist. It would be very simple to set up a wiki on this site.  Would I have some support in setting this up and especially maintaining it from the people who read this post? Do you think it would be something valuable to have, to point people to, to spread the reality about our preferred lifestyle?

Oh wow, I had no idea you’d be running up for this opportunity! 😀

 

Body painting

Body painting. The skin art.

body painting Body painting fascinates me. It’s incredible to see what artists can do to a canvas of skin. How they transform people into walking and talking pieces of art. I took the picture on the left (click it for a larger version) at a fantasy fair here in the Netherlands. It was the first time they had a live body painting demonstration, and the fact people were allowed to take photos was quite unique.

 

bp02The light on the image on the right is bad, sorry for that, but the sun was out in full blaze. (This image is also clickable for a larger version.)

This lady was being transformed in a universe. Very beautiful to witness.

It’s stunning to see how these artists pour themselves into their work, creating beautiful images. Another interesting thing to learn while watching them work was to see how long this actually takes! It’s not like tossing on some colours, dabbing a few more blotches with a brush and that’s it. The models have to stand there for hours. Literally. If you think about having your body painted one day, make sure you’re up to the physical challenge. You stand there, at times with your arms stretched out, for a LONG time.

bp03Another (clickable) image with even poorer light. Still I want to show it to you.

This model was transformed into a dragon-like creature. Not only paint but also foam stubs, painted in the right colours.

Spencer Tunick

As I walked around there and watched these people at work, I wondered how much effort had to go into the works of Spencer Tunick, the man who created the Sea of Hull and the amazing rush of red people in Munich, Germany a while ago.

Sea of Hull, Spencer Tunick. Image courtesy of The Guardian.
Sea of Hull, Spencer Tunick. Image courtesy of The Guardian.

World Bodypainting Festival

Here is a video from World Bodypainting Day 2016. An opportunity for you to see how much work this really is.

It is an amazing way to decorate a person. More versatile and more personal than any kind of clothing can be. If ever I have the chance to be painted in such a way I’ll certainly grab it. I already wonder what I would like to have on me.

What would your favourite colours, scenes and/or patterns be?

Nude or naked?

Some of you may know that I write books. Writing books and stories means you have to consider the meaning of words carefully.

Considering the words ‘nude’ and ‘naked’.

They both refer to the state of being undressed, uncovered, clothes-free, yes. Still, to me they have a different charge as it were. Wikipedia’s take on these point to the same thing. Nudity. To me there is however an underlying difference.

What nude is to me.

ZMDSC01418

To me this is nude. You may argue that I’m naked in this picture so let me explain. When I am nude, I’m undressed, I appreciate it to the max and I am ‘in my power’. I am undressed by my own choice and proud of my state of being. When I took this picture it wasn’t warm. There was fog all around. Still I felt wonderful there, in nature, one with the elements of the moment. That is when you are in your centre of power.

What is naked to me.

caught_naked

Here is an example of someone I think is naked. It’s the ‘oops’ moment, the shyness, the not wanting to be seen like this.

It is when someone feels exposed and vulnerable.

Look at it this way: when you are nude and you walk around in the rain when it’s not cold, that’s all fine. You’ll get wet but you won’t shiver, you don’t feel bad.

When that same rain comes over you and it starts getting cold, you’ll feel naked. Exposed and vulnerable because this is not pleasant at all.

Note that this is just one example.

Naked does not always mean you’re weak.

Absolutely not, unless you make yourself weak. Having the courage to make yourself vulnerable is not a sign of weakness. It’s a sign of a different kind of strength. The world live in is a hard place where being weak is frowned upon. You have to be strong, in armour, fast and in control. Daring to be naked means you dare to be yourself, to be a real person who doesn’t want to be strong all the time. Trying to be strong all the time will wear you out on an emotional level or even detach you from your emotions. You become a machine, a robot.

Naturists and nudists, as far as I have met and talked with them, have the deliberate ability to go beyond that trap. They bare themselves. They make themselves naked as well as nude. They want to be vulnerable. Go into the mountains where you encounter nothing but sharp rocks and take off your clothes there.

ZMRocks
Me on the rocks in Wales

See? You are vulnerable. This doesn’t mean you’re weak. This just means you acknowledge you’re not made of iron and you understand how thin your skin is, especially when you scrape against that rock.

The vulnerability is where you put it.

As you see, there are more ways to feel vulnerable. Good ways and bad ways. Getting caught in something you shouldn’t do makes you vulnerable, even when you’re completely dressed. The power of allowing yourself to be vulnerable, naked, is something different. You bring that upon yourself. You say to the world, “Yes, this is me as I am. Naked, unprotected.” That kind of vulnerability should gather respect. It does from me.

naked-and-afraid-cambodia-2

It’s entirely different from the popular TV series ‘Naked and Afraid’ where people put themselves in danger willingly.

I certainly respect the courage of the people who do this, but I don’t respect their nakedness as the kind I described earlier.

Be nude, dear friend. And dare to be naked. It makes you more complete as a human.

Paul.

(This post appeared originally on ClothesLifeFree. I thought it important enough to share it here.)

Nudist in the House.

This post was originally published on Tumblr.

Nudist in the house.

It can be, and is, a real thrill to be sneaky about nudity. There’s always the chance of getting caught. There’s the risk of what might happen. A lingering question of, “How far can I go?”

But that’s not what we’re really asking. We’re really asking, “What would it be like to live like this all the time?” The issue is admitting it to ourselves and acting on it.

It’s scary admitting something personal. Especially when a game or passing fancy turns out to play a very active role in our lives. What it comes down to is knowing ourselves and our families.

Honesty is a key component of nudity and a healthy family. It’s unreasonable to be 100% honest. There are some things our families may not want to know or understand. But it doesn’t matter as long as we are being honest with ourselves.

Nudism isn’t about hiding who we are. It’s about finding out more about ourselves and enjoying our life. If we find we enjoy being nude in whatever form it takes, we need to admit it to ourselves and embrace it as part of our lives.

If nudity is a part of our life, then we should find what our families think of it. If they are okay with it then our time of sneaking about might be over. Then let’s see how far can we go?

It’s a big, brave world out there with endless possibilities. Don’t let dishonesty and fear hold you back from what you enjoy.

Text by Made in the Nude.

Rediscovering the Radical Feminism of the Neo Naturists

Note: I found this article at https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-the-neo-naturists-empowered-women-to-be-wild-and-free and am reposting it here.

Rediscovering the Radical Feminism of the Neo Naturists

Neo Naturists, Swimming and Walking Experiment, Centre Point Fountains, Tottenham Court Rd, London, Aug 1984. Courtesy of the Neo Naturists Archive and Studio Voltaire.

“The Neo Naturists like taking their clothes off for the sake of it,” Christine Binnie and Wilma Johnson wrote in a 1985 manifesto—and that’s exactly what they did. A British underground art movement born out of the 1980s, the Neo Naturists were a body-painting trio of female flashers, made up of Christine, her sister Jennifer, and their friend Johnson.

The artists began to appear on the London club scene around 1981, turning up at Heaven in Soho (one of London’s first gay clubs) or the punk music venue The Fridge in Brixton, adorned in nothing but paint. They would perform on stage, chanting songs and throwing up their legs in an unruly version of the cancan. At other times, they’d simply flash at the crowd. Beneath their overcoats they had perfected a number of looks painted directly onto their bodies, including trompe l’oeil lingerie, and wild, grinning faces that transformed breasts into eyes and belly buttons into nostrils.

The Neo Naturists had their heyday from 1981–1986, but they have reformed this summer for a retrospective at Studio Voltaire in London. The show is an archival assemblage of paintings, slides and photographs, low-fi videos recorded in nightclubs, newspaper clippings and other ephemera—and, pressed on the gallery walls, body-prints made by the Neo Naturists themselves, some of whom painted their bodies for the first time in 20 years.

Neo Naturists, Christine Binnie body painted at Central St Martins, London 1 April 1980. Courtesy of the Neo Naturists Archive and Studio Voltaire.

The group has its roots in the punk anarchy of 1980s London, an era marked by the ruthless free market spirit ushered in by Margaret Thatcher and the subcultures that emerged in resistance to it. One of those was a cross-dressing scene known as New Romanticism, which was a breeding ground for exquisitely androgynous club kids like Boy George and Marilyn. The Neo Naturists were part of that scene, collaborating with Marilyn as well as other now-famous artists such as Grayson Perry and filmmaker John Maybury.

As much as they were aligned with the New Romantics, they were also satirists of them, deliberately positioning themselves in opposition to the scene’s slick sophistication and skinny bodies, a form of dandyism that was largely enjoyed by men. Instead, the Neo Naturists were rebellious, curvaceous, and pagan. Their main concern was to take pleasure in the act, and to celebrate the natural forms of their bodies.

“I swapped my Flesh Tint oil paint for some blue and gold body paint and transformed her into a voluptuous version of Tutankhamen’s sarcophagus,” Johnson recalls—in the exhibition’s catalogue essay—of the first time she painted Christine. They freely incorporated materials close to hand, taping household items to their bodies, and their 1985 manifesto includes an inventory: “Boiled crab, shrimps, tin foil, gold leaf, paper doilies, biscuits, peanuts, bottle of wine, Scotch pancakes, contraceptive sheaths, squid, sheep’s heart, bikini briefs, sausages, bacon and eggs, freezer bag wombs, apples, burning incense, knives and forks, £10 notes, sequins, vitamins, tins of tuna, and of course, lots of Sellotape.”

Left: Neo Naturists, Swimming and Walking Experiment, Centre Point Fountains, Tottenham Court Rd, London, Aug 1984; Right: Neo Naturists, Flashing in the British Museum, Christine Binnie body painted and photographed by Wilma Johnson, British Museum London, 3 March 1982. Courtesy of the Neo Naturists Archive and Studio Voltaire.

In one of their most iconic works, Flashing in the British Museum (1982), Christine donned a shaggy coat and pranced through the British Museum, flashing her painted body beside Egyptian relics and Greek antiquities. (“Just wear a big coat,” she once advised would-be flashers: “It’s easy!”) Another performance, Pink Punk Yoga (1982), at The Fridge in Brixton blended the incongruous practices of punk and meditation, while Sexist Crabs (1983) at the Zap Club in Brighton was a chaotic gambol around the stage with seafood taped to their bodies.

They eschewed rehearsals, preferring ritualistic improvisation, and sometimes they simply took to the streets, as in Swimming and Walking Experiment (1984), when they cavorted in the fountains below London’s Brutalist tower block Centre Point—and got arrested by the police. Occasionally, they made the headlines, outraging some conservative hacks and delighting others. “Hooray for the Bare Binnies!” crooned the Daily Star of 1984.

For women to take such pleasure in their art was deeply subversive. Like all heretics, they didn’t play by anyone else’s rules. They opted for spontaneous exuberance, in contrast to the message of Thatcherite conservatism (be professional!) or the affected, male-dominated New Romantics (be flamboyant!).“The Neo Naturists are casual to the point of excess,” their manifesto states. “[They] believe that gorgeousness is the ultimate intelligence.”

Left: Neo Naturists, Paper Dress at the Embassy Club with George O’Dowd as Brittania, The Coffee Spoon Embassy Club, London, 5 Sep 1980. Courtesy of the Neo Naturists Archive and Studio Voltaire.; Right: Neo Naturists, Private View Performance at James Birch Gallery, Kings Road London, 24 May 1984. Courtesy of james Birch and the Neo Naturists Archive, and Studio Voltaire.

As Studio Voltaire curator Jessica Vaughan points out, one important aspect to understand about the Neo Naturists is that their display of the female body was in no way pornographic. “What they were doing was radical,” says Vaughan, “because they were delighting in the female form in a way that isn’t titillating or sexualized, but instead is something full of humor and celebration.”

The Neo Naturists did not commodify their practice, and they were never picked up by a commercial gallery. By the end of the 1980s, they had moved out of the squat they shared and dispersed. Many of the men from their circle, however, went on to become successful British artists, including Perry, Maybury, and Michael Clark. “It’s not the first time that female artists were forgotten,” Vaughan says, “while male counterparts, who were incredibly influenced by the women around them, went on to become household names.”

There are a multitude of reasons why the Neo Naturists slipped through the net. For one, nobody quite knew what to make of them. “Feminists see us as porno sex cabaret, while your average person sees us as butch dykes,” Jennifer said in an interview in the 1980s. “We’re not either.” Their work was only obliquely political, more concerned with celebrating the personal: their friendships with one another, and their bodies. “The Neo Naturists are works of art,” the manifesto quips, “and the world is their private view.”

Left: Neo Naturists, Sexist Crabs and The Cosmic Egg, Portland Bill Quarry and Sculpture Park, Portland, Yorkshire, 1 Aug 1983; Right: Neo Naturists, Black Rapport Day, Thames Beach Wapping, 17 July 1982 (Jennifer Binnie, Wilma Johnson, Nico Holah and Bruce Lacey). Courtesy of the Neo Naturists Archive and Studio Voltaire.

It wasn’t entirely over for the Neo Naturists in 1986, but they left behind a fragmented opus. Following the group’s dispersal, Christine went solo and kept the movement active well into this millennium. In the 1990s, she assembled a small archive in her east London apartment, and one of the Studio Voltaire curators’ projects has been to expand it. “We’ve been trying to get a comprehensive overview of the movement, and a secure chronology,” Vaughan says. “There’s a quite a bit of guesswork because Wilma, Jen, and Christine might all remember things differently. But looking back, they were an incredible counterpoint to the queer male voices of the time, and they mustn’t be overlooked.”

 

Book review: the “Volunteer”

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Did you notice the quotes around Volunteer?

This was a very entertaining and good book. I love the subject: a girl being recruited as a ‘volunteer’ in a project on public nudity. I won’t spoil the story for you.

The book was well written, easy to follow and it kept its pace all through the story. The challenges Danielle has to overcome are quite intriguing and in ways even eye-opening. If you appreciate a book that deal with public nudity on a proper level, the “Volunteer” is for you.

You can find the Kindle edition of this book following this link.