Nude hiking is the best

While you read this, I’m probably on my way home from a short vacation on one of the Canary Islands. These islands are wonderful for the naked tourist. No, alas, that doesn’t mean you can wander around in the nude anywhere without getting into trouble, but they offer lots of places where you can.

On Easter Sunday I was out for a walk. I had been looking forward to this particular one as it is a walk I can’t do at home (lacking mountains and the space to do it naked).

Walks like this are always good. I know that many of you, reading this, can and will agree.

For me, the experience of consciously taking my clothes off and going for a long walk (this one was about 3 kilometres long) is an almost spiritual experience.

I am peeling away the physical boundaries between me and nature. All of me will be able to feel the sun and the wind. All of me will be moving without being bothered (yes, that is really it) by the stuff other people demand I wear when in most kinds of company.

And the best thing: it’s free.

And then I mean free in the most literal meaning. No one who has a problem with me being how I want to be. Nothing holding me back except gravity (and I am very grateful for that one 😉 ).

Having this possibility to walk around clothes-free is truly amazing. The sad thing always comes when the walk comes to an end and I have to put the hot stuff on again. That moment tells me how unnatural it is to wear clothes in an environment that is made for bodily liberty.

I can hardly wait to go on another nude hike. Let’s hope the world will someday get its act together and understand that our lifestyle isn’t bad. That we’re actually preserving energy and water.

And let’s hope it happens in our lifetime.

We could do with a new hippie-wave

This might strike you as odd, certainly if you don’t know a thing about hippies.

Hippies rose in the 1960. Flower power, free love, and yes, nudity, were some of the things that hippies promoted. They were against war (I like that) and most of them promoted a relaxed, kind, loving lifestyle.

A famous hippie song

During those times, especially in the beginning, hippies shocked most of the good people with their open way of life and their appreciation of the human body. I think it’s the nudity that was the biggest hangup for people.

A couple with matching flower body paint walks together during the Isle of Wight Festival in the UK in 1970.

As the picture above and certainly the following one show, nudity was a normal thing among hippies. They had no issues with it. That is what made me think how we could do with another hippie-wave.

Mother and child swimming in a lake. It was no problem for them.

Hippies weren’t just located in a single place, they were everywhere. San Francisco was a famous town, but also London, Amsterdam, and every other large city had their share of them, and everywhere the good people were surprised with their alternative way of life. Like we do these days.

Which suddenly gives me this thought:

Are we the new hippies?

The selfie situation

I guess several of the readers of this blog have some experience with this one. How do you take a decent selfie when you’re out and about?

Many times, at least in my situation, I’m out on a walk alone. Taking a good picture of a nice spot with myself in it often becomes a problem because: a) what fun is it to haul a tripod around all the time, and b) images using a selfie-stick always make it clear you’re using such a device.

So now I look at you, reader of this blog.

Clearly a selfie-stick user…

How do you make your pictures? Sometimes I see great shots that clearly aren’t done with a selfie-stick. Do you carry tripods around? Do you use other means to set up your camera/phone for a good shot?

Or do you use more advanced methods? For instance I could imagine that the use of a drone could be an option, but that would come down to a very expensive selfie stick, or isn’t that the case anymore?

I’m really curious about this and I am looking forward to your responses!

Fundamental human rights

A while ago I ran into this tweet:

While I do agree with the sentiment behind it, I replied to the original poster that it’s not in the list of human rights as agreed upon.

Because I like simplicity, I found this website which tells you about the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights in an easy to understand form. (Yes, it’s for children. I said I like simple, right?)

I also had a problem with the claim that we are forced to buy and wear clothes. I don’t think that’s true. We’re supposed to cover up, dictated by law, in the name of ‘decency’ (theirs, not ours). Walking around in a cardboard box is also covering up, even if you found (did not buy) that box.

Perhaps this blog post is too much over such a tweet but I do like to check the facts before I make claims like the original poster made in his tweet.

Thinking further on this subject, I wonder how far one could go in the clothing arena. On textile beaches, the amount of actual textile can dwindle down to something you can’t even make a handkerchief of.

Or, like the lady on the right, would something like this go against the hairs of the textile-loving community? She is dressed, after all, and from the looks of her, the dress and the location it’s a very expensive design too.

We all know that clothing is massively overrated these days. I recall seeing people in wool hoodies when it’s so hot that birds faint in flight. Long coats and long pants when the asphalt is close to melting. These people take things a few notches too far.

Still, there is no human right to be naked (and that’s a shame…)