Sunday Noon Nudist

Nude people make the world more colourful.

Is naturism natural or is it a fad in people’s minds?

Is naturism natural?

According to the blogger at The Sovereign State it isn’t. (Note that this is an article from August 2009.)

The writer of that blogpost claims that we were never meant to walk around naked. His statement to prove this is that, “if this were the case, we would have developed fur. We didn’t because we were smart enough to make clothes“. (See second paragraph in the article.)

The second paragraph claims: “In other words, had there existed “naturists” in these latitudes a few thousands years ago, they’d have simply died out.”

There are quite a few comments added to that post, some clearly from naturists.

The basic idea of clothing.

We put on clothes to be warm. In that view the writer of that post is entirely correct. What he seems to ignore (as so many others who are against anything naked unless perhaps it’s porn) is that little bit “to be warm“.
As we all know, most people live in areas that aren’t cold all the time.

Some people even live in areas where it’s never cold, like in Africa or Central and South America.

Does that mean these people, who are known to be naked, are wrong? Should they wear clothes because their naked, naturist appearance isn’t natural?

Lustful eyes.

Another paragraph in that post gives me a lot of reason to believe that this person shows something about himself instead of the average naturist:

I really don’t care if people choose to make themselves look ridiculous by adopting a naturist lifestyle, but some people drag their children into it and that’s what bothers me. Of course they argue that there’s nothing sexual about their perversion, but this is just wishful thinking. Their children, teenage girls most worryingly, are exposed to lustful eyes.

Anyone who reads this and feels him-or herself a proper nudist or naturist will cringe at this. “Ridiculous” isn’t how I feel when I wear no clothes. “Free” is much closer to it. One more chalked up for ignorance and prejudice, folks.

I’ve seen naked children at nude beaches and at resorts. I’ve yet to find kids who are happier than they, despite the watchful eyes of their parents and other adults who look after them. Oh, I mean lustful eyes of course.

Clothes are great.

I’m serious. But only when the conditions call for them.

When it’s hot we don’t need them. Unless you think that an air conditioning system is natural.

 

Sunday Noon Nudist

Simply a peaceful scene.

Public nudity in Britain, and nobody runs for the hills.

Public nudity in Britain.

There’s naked yoga, naked dating, naked dining. But is it OK to take your clothes off in public? There’s only one way to find out…

This is the headline of a very interesting article in the Guardian that was brought to my attention a few weeks back.

‘Nobody runs for the hills’: is Britain ready for everyday nudity?

Charlie Gilmour public nudity
Charlie Gilmour: ‘Being naked is profoundly liberating.’ Photograph: Sarah Lee for the Guardian.
It’s like a dream. I’m at the pub with a pint of stout and a packet of nuts, wearing no clothes. Families tuck into their Sunday roasts, darts players carry on unperturbed. No one gives me so much as a second glance. I could get used to this.

How things have changed. In 1974, when Sally Cooper stripped naked and attempted to run across Richmond Bridge in west London, she caused a national sensation. Caught momentarily in the jaws of a police dog and eternally by the lens of a tabloid photographer, she was one of Britain’s first streakers. At the time, public nudity was virtually unheard of. Naturists, or “sunbathers” as they often euphemistically called themselves, kept to the shadows.

Today, naked people are everywhere. No longer happy to be hidden in naturist clubs and on nudist beaches, the bare body has jiggled its way into areas previously reserved for the clothed, round the dinner table and on primetime TV. London had a pop-up naked restaurant, the Bunyadi, with a waiting list 46,000 strong, Last year saw the launch of Naked Attraction, Channel 4’s full-frontal dating show. We have naked yoga, a naked nightclub and, of course, naked Justin Bieber. Does this mean Britain has come to terms with collective undress?

I’m no naturist, but there have been moments over the years when it has felt appropriate to publicly disrobe. A mass skinny-dip after a friend’s seaside wedding was liberating, a slosh into the Serpentine on a sweltering summer evening was thrilling, and there was one time, perhaps slightly unwise, at a party where the drinks were flowing freely and the heating was on far too high and… nudity may have occurred.

Being naked is profoundly liberating. It’s not just the physical feeling of the air, sun or sea over your entire body: there’s a psychological release, too. When you shed your clothes, many social pressures also somehow fall away. A 2015 survey by British Naturism, the national society for social nudity, found that practising naturists had higher self-esteem and body confidence.

Yet, from personal experience, I’ve found reactions can be unappreciative, ranging from mothers screaming and covering their children’s eyes to hostile attention from security personnel. So which Britain are we: a nation of nudes or prudes? I decided to find out.
***
You can read the entire article here, at the Guardian.

Aussie Nudist Olympics take a move

Queensland has lost a $2 million-a-year tourism event to New South Wales where nude bathing is legal and their police do not arrest nudists for wilful exposure.

The annual Nude Olympics, which pulls more than 600 people a year to Noosa’s Alexandria Bay after the first event 40 years ago, has been cancelled.

Nudists in Europe try a spot of beach archery. Photo: Michel Gangne

The event, organised by the Australian Naturists Federation, will be held this March at Byron Bay, either at its legal Tyagarah nude beach or the north Belongil Beach.

Both beaches are on the northern coastline of Byron Bay.

Queensland has lost the $2 million a year Nude Olympics in part because of a crackdown on nude bathers.

Queensland is the only state that does not allow its councils to vote and choose “clothing-optional” beaches.

Negotiations have begun with Byron Shire Council to hold the 2017 Nude Olympics at Belongil Beach.

Source: Brisbane Times where you can read more about this.

Sunday Noon Nudist

Fixing it is easy, and best done without clothing!

When naturism costs jobs

I’m sure you all read or heard about it. A British school teacher, Christine Wright, was told to take early retirement after the school she worked at found out she was a naturist.

She said: “It’s not something I ever spoke about at work but some busy body outed me.

“They rang up my employer and told them I was a naturist. To hurt me. It ended up with me taking early retirement. I’m not going deny who I am.”

I was bloody well shocked after hearing about this. How sad is this, to force someone out of the job they love, because of a brain-twisted idiot who doesn’t know the difference between a life style and paedophiles?

I truly believe that teachers are most at risk of losing their jobs, because they work with children, and – as we all know – the children’s tender souls need to be protected from the big bad world where people walk around with no clothes. Murder and other kinds of violence are okay, greed is applauded, but OMG, as the expression goes, no nudity please!

She says she believes that naturism is misunderstood, comparing them to other minorities.

She added: “Sometimes I think we’re in the same position the gay community were in 20 years ago.

I hope we all will live to see the day that naturism isn’t considered the bad thing that many uneducated people think it is.

(Quotes and image courtesy of The Irish Sun.)